Browse Plant Pathology Stories - Page 13

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University of Georgia Cooperative Extension turfgrass specialist Clint Waltz was among the UGA experts who presented their research findings at the Turfgrass Research Field Day on Thursday, Aug. 4. Waltz is shown explaining how commonly used products, like insect repellant, sunscreen, cooking oil and powdered Gatorade, can harm a turfgrass lawn. CAES News
Turfgrass Updates
More than 800 people braved the hot August temperatures for a firsthand glimpse of the latest research by University of Georgia scientists at the Turfgrass Research Field Day held Thursday, Aug. 4, on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia.
A herbicide trial on the turfgrass research plots at the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Turfgrass Research Field Day
Whether you're a homeowner, new landscape company owner or a veteran golf course superintendent, you'll find the latest research-based information on growing and maintaining turfgrass at the University of Georgia Turfgrass Research Field Day.
A picture of a corn field from a few years ago. Recent rains have helped this year's corn crop, according to UGA Extension specialist Eric Prostko. CAES News
Road Trip
Like many other young people, plant pathology graduate student Russell Ingram’s friends have an epic road trip planned for this summer. The difference is that instead of setting off for a music festival in the desert or visiting a beach, Ingram’s pals are hitting the road in search of jobs.
Harald Scherm, professor of plant pathology and assistant dean for research at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, will take over as department head for plant pathology on July 1, 2016. CAES News
Plant Pathology Head
After nearly two decades helping farmers combat the diseases affecting Georgia’s most prominent fruit crops, Professor Harald Scherm has been appointed head of the University of Georgia’s Department of Plant Pathology following a national search.
Abraham Fulmer (center) visits a U.S. peanut field with Haitian agronomist Jean Phillipe Dorzin (left) and Will Sheard of Meds & Food for Kids (right), in 2015. CAES News
Plant Pathology Abroad
When he started college, Abraham Fulmer didn’t know he’d study peanuts, work in international development or become fascinated with Haiti.
Professor Nick Hill harvests corn from his test plots at the J. Phil Campbell Research and Education Center in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Corn Boil
The University of Georgia faculty and staff at the J. Phil Campbell Sr. Research and Education Center in Watkinsville will host the center’s annual corn boil and open house on June 28 from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Dean and Director Sam Pardue, far left, and CAES Associate Dean for Research Bob Shulstad, far right, congratulate doctorate students Forrest Goodfellow and Shuyang Zhen and master's degree student Erin Roestshcehl on their E. Broadus Browne Awards for creative research. CAES News
Graduate Awards Night
University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences recognized its best and brightest graduate students at the 2016 Graduate Student Recognition Reception on May 2, 2016.
University of Georgia researchers are studying the effectiveness of applying a Bacillus bacteria species to the stigmas of female flowers to slow the spread of bacterial fruit blotch from seed to seedling. CAES News
Battling Blotch
Georgia farmers struggle to control bacterial fruit blotch (BFB), but University of Georgia plant pathologists have discovered that naturally occurring bacteria can combat the disease.
Georgia strawberry farmers typically spray fungicides to control Botrytis and anthracnose (shown), two fungi that cause fruit rot. University of Georgia researchers are testing a mobile app, created by University of Florida scientists, that uses temperature and leaf moisture monitors to recommend when farmers should spray for diseases. CAES News
Strawberry App
University of Georgia and University of Florida researchers are testing the Strawberry Advisory System in Georgia strawberry fields. SAS, an app created, in part, by UF plant pathologist Natalia Peres, uses temperature and leaf moisture monitors to recommend when farmers should spray for Botrytis and anthracnose, two fungi that cause fruit rot on strawberries.
Here is a picture of a  peach tree orchard. CAES News
Peach Pest Management
University of Georgia plant pathologist Phil Brannen is concerned that Georgia peach growers can’t tell the difference between phony peach disease and weevil or nematode damage. A consequence could be that farmers unnecessarily destroy trees and potential fruit.