Browse Plant Pathology Stories - Page 12

240 results found for Plant Pathology
Tomato leaves can curl in response to environmental stresses, like lack of water, or as a symptom of a disease, like tomato leaf curl virus, shown here. CAES News
Think Ahead
Georgia’s hot, muggy summers provide the perfect conditions for diseases to thrive in. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialist Elizabeth Little says the secret to fighting diseases in homegrown vegetables is to stay a few steps ahead of them.
Twenty-one CAES graduate students hit the road in May to explore crop protection career opportunities in Florida. CAES News
Crop Protection Careers
The search for a perfect job can feel like a major quest. That quest turns literal for a group of University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) students for one week each summer.
A yellow squash matures on the vine of a squash plant growing in Butts County, Georgia. CAES News
Squash Struggles
Pests and diseases make summer squash one of the most challenging vegetables to grow in Georgia home gardens, according to University of Georgia plant pathologist Elizabeth Little, who studies plant diseases and control methods at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
University of Georgia graduate student Zach Matteen conducted trials on 11 varieties of winter squash at UGA's Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia, on land used to grow organic crops. Matteen tested winter squash varieties 'Waltham' butternut, 'Zeppelin' delicata, 'Metro PMR' butternut, Seminole pumpkin, Choctaw sweet potato, 'Thai Kang Kob' tropical pumpkin, 'Thelma Sanders' sweet potato and a fifth-generation cross of 'Waltham' butternut and Seminole pumpkin. He found that the two sweet potato squashes and Seminole, tropical and tan cheese pumpkins held up best against squash pests and diseases. CAES News
Winter Squash
By determining the varieties best suited for the area, University of Georgia graduate student Zach Matteen is on a mission to convince more backyard gardeners and farmers to grow winter squash. He has found that Seminole, tropical and tan cheese pumpkins, as well as Choctaw and 'Thelma Sanders' sweet potato squashes, hold up best against squash pests and diseases.
Based on the UGA Tifton Campus, Ron Gitaitis researches bacterial diseases on Vidalia onions, and he was the first scientist to discover three species of onion bacteria. He has published numerous reports and journal articles, and has mentored scientists at UGA and other institutions throughout his career. Many of his discoveries shaped production practices in the Vidalia region. CAES News
Onion HOF
Ron Gitaitis, a plant pathologist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, was inducted into the Vidalia Onion Hall of Fame by the Vidalia Onion Committee at the committee’s annual awards banquet, held on Feb. 4 at the Vidalia Community Center in Vidalia, Georgia.
Healthy peanuts compared to peanuts infected with white mold disease. CAES News
La Nina Weather Pattern
A La Nina weather pattern is providing warmer winter temperatures for Georgia residents, sparking farmers’ concerns about potential plant diseases at the start of production season in early spring.
Leaf spot damage seen on a peanut leaf. CAES News
Leaf Spot Disease
Georgia peanut growers are experiencing problematic leaf spot diseases this year due to susceptible varieties and weakening fungicide treatments, according to Albert Culbreath and Tim Brenneman, plant pathologists at the University of Georgia Tifton Campus.
On Nov. 7, 2016 the University of Georgia College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences honored faculty and staff at the D.W. Brooks Lecture and Awards Ceremony. Those honored included; from left front row; Brian Fairchild, Julia Gaskin, JoAnne Norris, Wayne Parrott, Bill Tyson; and from left back row; Peter LaFayette, Carla Barnett, Lindsey Barner, Tim Brenneman, Nick Fuhrman and Ron Walcott. CAES News
D.W. Brooks Lecture and Awards
One in four children will suffer severe developmental issues due to hunger. Although this number may be overwhelming, nothing will change if people continue to ignore the problem.
University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences master's degree student Esther Akoto works with composting barrels as part of her research into whether composting kills the aflatoxin-producing molds in peanut field waste. CAES News
Committed to Compost
Ghana native Esther Yeboah Akoto, who is currently pursuing her master’s degree in food science and technology at the University of Georgia, is working to help farmers diminish aflatoxin contamination in their soil by composting field waste.
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is challenging its students — and students across the university — to become entrepreneurial groundbreakers through FABricate, a contest of student ideas to help feed the world. CAES News
FABricate Challenge
From the development of the iron plow to the noble impulse to turn peanuts into a delicious sandwich spread, groundbreaking visionaries have repeatedly reshaped the way the world eats.