food waste (1) CAES News
UGA crop specialist combats postharvest food waste with research and education
Agricultural producers around the world are constantly faced with risks to their crops from disease, weather and pests, but even more losses occur after crops are harvested. In fact, nearly a third of all the food produced worldwide — approximately 1.3 billion tons — is lost to food wastage each year.
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The Bulldogs behind the Georgia jack-o’-lantern
The quest for the perfect pumpkin each fall doesn’t start at the local patch. In fact, it starts up to 10 years prior for researchers like University of Georgia plant geneticist Cecilia McGregor. McGregor leads breeding efforts in the selective pumpkin variety called the ‘Orange Bulldog’, following the retirement of the program’s founder, horticulturist George Boyhan.
Five members of the faculty and staff of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) and UGA Cooperative Extension have been honored as members of the Fruit and Vegetable 40 Under 40 Class of 2021. CAES News
CAES researchers, Extension professionals honored in Fruit and Vegetable 40 under 40
Five members of the faculty and staff of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and UGA Cooperative Extension have been honored as members of the Fruit and Vegetable 40 Under 40 Class of 2021.
John Ruter, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org CAES News
Are your trees boys or girls — or both?
Female flowers and female trees produce fruit and seeds. Male flowers and trees produce pollen. Making the correct choice of tree gender can be important. Anyone who has ever smelled putrid ginkgo fruit, washed mulberries off their car or sneezed at tree pollen should understand.
On average, Bradford pear trees live around 10 to 15 years, 20 with luck, and will literally begin to self-destruct with any storm winds that blow through. CAES News
Popular trees provide flower power but don't last the test of time
Some trees naturally live longer than others but, ironically, many of the most popular landscape trees tend to be relatively short-lived. Although their flowers are quite attractive, Bradford or Callery pears are generally considered short-lived trees, and they are also highly invasive.
Often planted to create borders or buffers, Leyland cypress trees can grow four feet taller in just a year. Planting too close together or too close to structures can present a huge problem as the tree matures. CAES News
Leyland cypress trees often planted incorrectly
Leyland cypress are one of the most commonly planted landscape trees, but poor site selection and disease pressure may soon send them the way of red tips and Bradford pears.