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While blueberries are known to be susceptible to postharvest injuries, resulting in fruit softening or splitting during harvest, handling and storage, UGA researchers are trying to figure out why some crops experience greater losses. CAES News
Blueberry Quality
A multidisciplinary team of University of Georgia agriculture experts are working to determine causes and solutions to postharvest quality problems that have hit Georgia’s blueberry growers hard in recent seasons. Funded by the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Office of Research and UGA Cooperative Extension, the project will address “major issues” with fruit quality, particularly in rabbiteye blueberries.
A peanut split in half lengthwise, exposing the pale, immature peanut inside the shell. Photo by Edwin Remsburg for UGA CAES CAES News
Peanut Protectors
On a warm morning in mid-September, tractor-drawn peanut-digging equipment burrowed beneath the peanut vines on the first of Tift County peanut farmer Greg Davis’s fields. This is the day peanut producers — and University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents and UGA peanut researchers — work all season for.
University of Georgia peanut plant pathologist Bob Kemerait speaks to the crowd during the 2022 Peanut Tour. Photo courtesy of the Georgia Peanut Commission. CAES News
Peanut Cultivation
From year to year, many row crop producers rotate the crops they plant to reduce pest and disease pressure and to benefit the land, often alternating peanuts with cotton and corn. Peanuts in particular are considered an important cash crop for many farmers.
Field to jar series: Breeding the best peanut CAES News
Peanut Breeding
Whether they show up whole in a candy bar, are transformed into a sandwich spread or lend earthy notes to a spicy curry, peanuts are an important part of foodways in the U.S. and of cuisines from around the world. Georgia is the No. 1 peanut-producing state in the U.S., growing approximately 52% of the peanuts produced in the country in 2021, mostly in the state’s sandy Coastal Plain region.
Tiger Mountain Winery CAES News
Cropping Up
When Cassandra and Gary Wiseman bought 185 acres of land in rural Jackson County, Georgia, they envisioned preserving the land through sustainable forestry stewardship. Over the next decade, they recognized the abundance of naturally growing muscadine vines throughout the property. This bounty ultimately sparked the dream of operating a vineyard and winery on the property.
UGA's Southeast Research and Education Center will host its annual field day from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 10. The 720-acre facility has over 60 ongoing research projects, with an emphasis on the efficient use of water. CAES News
Midville Field Day
The University of Georgia Southeast Research and Education Center will host its annual field day from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 10. The annual event is an open house tour of current research projects taking place at the center where College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences faculty will highlight the work they are doing in cotton, peanuts, soybeans, corn, small grains and cover crops.
corn rust CAES News
Southern Corn Rust
Georgia’s corn producers should be on alert for southern corn rust, a devastating disease that has been found in several Georgia counties this year, exacerbated by a warm La Niña winter and hot, humid conditions so far this season.
The Southern IPM Center has recognized UGA Extension fruit pathologist Phil Brannen for his significant contributions to commercial fruit growers. CAES News
IPM Hall of Fame
The Southern Integrated Pest Management Center has inducted University of Georgia Cooperative Extension fruit pathologist Phil Brannen into the Integrated Pest Management Hall of Fame for his significant contributions to commercial fruit growers throughout the Southern U.S. over the past 30 years.
Aerial photo of soybean field at the UGA Northwest Research and Education Center in Rome, Georgia, by Henry Jordan CAES News
MyIPM Row Crops
New insect wreaking havoc in your cotton field? Troublesome disease in your peanut stand you don’t recognize? No idea where to start? There’s an app for that.
From left, the 2022 UGA-Griffin Classified Employee Award nominees include Clay Bennett of the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Melissa Slaughter of the Center for Food Safety, Darrin Buice of Field Research Services, Ashley Biles of the Assistant Provost and Campus Director’s Office, Brett Byous of the Department of Entomology, Kimberly Allen of the Center for Urban Agriculture, Donna Kent of the Plant Genetics Resources Conservation Unit and Ree Rosser of the Facilities Management Division. CAES News
UGA-Griffin Awards
The University of Georgia Griffin campus recently named Ashley Biles and Clary “Ree” Rosser as the 2022 Classified Employees of the Year at the 33rd Annual Employee Recognition Ceremony.