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While blueberries are known to be susceptible to postharvest injuries, resulting in fruit softening or splitting during harvest, handling and storage, UGA researchers are trying to figure out why some crops experience greater losses. CAES News
Blueberry Quality
A multidisciplinary team of University of Georgia agriculture experts are working to determine causes and solutions to postharvest quality problems that have hit Georgia’s blueberry growers hard in recent seasons. Funded by the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Office of Research and UGA Cooperative Extension, the project will address “major issues” with fruit quality, particularly in rabbiteye blueberries.
A peanut split in half lengthwise, exposing the pale, immature peanut inside the shell. Photo by Edwin Remsburg for UGA CAES CAES News
Peanut Protectors
On a warm morning in mid-September, tractor-drawn peanut-digging equipment burrowed beneath the peanut vines on the first of Tift County peanut farmer Greg Davis’s fields. This is the day peanut producers — and University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents and UGA peanut researchers — work all season for.
bee on cone flower CAES News
Starting Seeds
It’s almost that time of year again: January is the month for seed catalogs galore. Seed catalogs are the embodiment of possibility, a chance for gardeners to envision the ever-elusive perfect garden. It is one of my favorite times in the garden year.
‘Smart’ greenhouses could slash electricity costs: Horticultural lighting consumes $600 million worth of electricity every year, but a new, internet-connected greenhouse lighting system designed by researchers out of UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Science could slash costs. CAES News
Year in Review
From Joro spiders and bald eagles to Guggenheim Fellows and “good stress,” 2022 was another fascinating year for UGA research. Here are 12 stories that capture readers’ attention and showcase the breadth of scholarly activity across the University of Georgia.
University of Georgia peanut plant pathologist Bob Kemerait speaks to the crowd during the 2022 Peanut Tour. Photo courtesy of the Georgia Peanut Commission. CAES News
Peanut Cultivation
From year to year, many row crop producers rotate the crops they plant to reduce pest and disease pressure and to benefit the land, often alternating peanuts with cotton and corn. Peanuts in particular are considered an important cash crop for many farmers.
Field to jar series: Breeding the best peanut CAES News
Peanut Breeding
Whether they show up whole in a candy bar, are transformed into a sandwich spread or lend earthy notes to a spicy curry, peanuts are an important part of foodways in the U.S. and of cuisines from around the world. Georgia is the No. 1 peanut-producing state in the U.S., growing approximately 52% of the peanuts produced in the country in 2021, mostly in the state’s sandy Coastal Plain region.
Horticulture Assistant Professor Kate Cassity-Duffey specializes in organic production. (Submitted photo) CAES News
Organic Transition
As demand for organic food continues to rise, organic agriculture has attracted both longtime producers and new farmers into the industry. University of Georgia researchers are working on a new study meant to develop best practices for transitioning farmers starting out with land that has been used for grazing or has lain fallow.
2022 Marie Fort Garden Club Scholarship CAES News
Marie Fort Garden Club scholarship
Srijana Thapa Magar was named the 2022 recipient of the Marie Fort Garden Club Scholarship, presented annually to a student in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at the University of Georgia Griffin campus. Thapa Magar, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Horticulture at UGA-Griffin, was thrilled to receive the award, which she said will help further her academic and career goals.
Although she has done extensive work in GMO advocacy, Van Eenennaam’s own research centers on a different topic entirely: genome editing. (Photo by Dennis McDaniel) CAES News
D.W. Brooks Lecture
Genetic improvement, particularly improvements related to animal production, has been one of the most transformational agricultural advancements in our history. The breeding of healthier, more productive livestock has been achieved through genetic selection over the course of time, both through natural genetic selection and through increased use of artificial insemination.
Agrify verticalfarmribboncutting 1 CAES News
Vertical Farms
Thanks in part to a new partnership between the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and Agrify, a company that produces vertical farming units, the controlled environment agriculture program at CAES has established two large-scale vertical farms on campus.