Browse Crop and Soil Sciences Stories - Page 4

673 results found for Crop and Soil Sciences
On agriculture Twitter, it’s not unusual to see @PrecAgEngineer tweeting about all things agriculture tech. From the latest field data collection to his daughter’s first attendance at a professional conference, Virk believes there is value in helping the public understand the role agriculture takes in our daily lives. CAES News
Precision Ag Researcher of the Year
Asked what his day looks like on a regular basis, Simer Virk laughed out loud. “There are no average days in research and Extension work — every day is different and every season is different,” said Virk, an assistant professor and University of Georgia Cooperative Extension precision agriculture specialist in UGA's Department of Crop and Soil Sciences.
MFELecture2022 RobertJones 1536x1025 CAES News
Chancellor Jones
Sixty years ago, Mary Frances Early blazed a trail as the first Black graduate of the University of Georgia. Robert J. Jones, chancellor of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, followed that trail years later and shared his experiences during the 2022 Mary Frances Early Lecture, held Feb. 22 in Mahler Hall at the Georgia Center for Continuing Education & Hotel.​​​​​​​
UGA Assistant Professor and Extension Precision Ag Specialist Simer Virk will be among the faculty members from UGA and peer institutions who will present on adopting agricultural technologies during two Utilizing Precision Ag Technology Workshops being held in late March. CAES News
Precision Agriculture Workshops
Registration is open through March 18 for the upcoming Utilizing Precision Ag Technology Workshop being presented by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and UGA Cooperative Extension on March 29 and 31.
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Winter Weather
While some U.S. regions, such as the Northeast and Midwest, have experienced consistent cold throughout the winter of 2022, the Southeast region, including Georgia, has seen a winter with varied temperatures. Those unpredictable temperatures, alongside moisture and frost, may have had a direct impact on plant survival, as plants’ ability to thrive or perish is ultimately determined by the weather.
Sustainable agriculture experts at the University of Georgia are offering a two-day intensive workshop March 23 and 24 to help small growers make the most of the upcoming season and build their farms into strong, productive businesses. CAES News
Sustainability Calculator
The muddy waters of what is considered “sustainable” are clearing up with the implementation of a new calculator that gives agricultural producers a reliable method to quantify a farm's sustainability.
UGA Arch from Broad Street CAES News
Presidential Interdisciplinary Seed Grants
Eleven grants totaling $1.5 million were awarded in November 2021 to recipients of the third round of Presidential Interdisciplinary Seed Grants. Overall the awards went to faculty from 13 UGA departments, centers, programs, schools and colleges.
Pam Knox visits a UGA weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Annual Weather Review
In 2021, Georgia experienced its coldest year since 2014, with an average temperature of 64.5 degrees Fahrenheit. But the temperature was still well above the long-term average of 63.4 F and ranked the 20th warmest year overall since statewide records began in 1895.
CAES researchers Mussie Habteselassie, Bochra Bahri and David Jespersen are testing the benefits of using nanobubble-infused irrigation water to more efficiently grow sods and maintain turfgrass. (Photo by Andrew Davis Tucker/UGA) CAES News
Tiny Bubbles
While the old song “Tiny Bubbles” lauds the happy effervescence of a glass of sparkling wine, new University of Georgia research on nanobubbles seeks to discover whether the tiniest of bubbles can hold beneficial properties for turfgrass.
Examples of a living mulch (top) and cereal rye cover crop terminated prior to planting (bottom). CAES News
Cover Crops, Living Mulches
For most row crop producers in Georgia, corn, cotton and peanut are planted in the spring and harvested in late fall. After harvest, the ground is left relatively bare, with the residue of the harvested crop the only organic material left on the ground. This is where cover crops come in.
Pam Knox visits a UGA weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Climate Input
The authors of the Southeast chapter of the Fifth National Climate Assessment will hold virtual workshops in late January and early February and are inviting the public to share their thoughts on climate change-related issues.