Browse Forestry Stories - Page 4

42 results found for Forestry
University of Georgia Extension livestock economist Curt Lacy presents university ag economists' 2014 predictions for Georgia products during the forecast event held in Macon on Jan. 24. CAES News
Georgia Ag Forecast
Georgia’s livestock producers may see higher profits in 2014 due to lower feed prices and higher consumer demand. However, those lower feed prices, and flat demand for corn for ethanol, may hold down profit margins for Georgia row crop farmers.
The bark of a black walnut tree CAES News
Money trees?
From time to time national news services pick up articles about someone who sold one walnut tree for thousands of dollars. This may stimulate the imagination of those who have large walnut trees in their landscape. These articles usually fail to mention that the tree was near a high quality hardwood veneer operation and had many burls that produce the most valuable veneer. The tree owner probably also guaranteed that there was no metal in the tree. No one living in Georgia can replicate this scenario.
Christmas tree grower Earl Worthington points to the grafting point where he joined a Fraser fir shoot to Momi fir rootstock. CAES News
Momi-Fraser fir
Fraser firs top the list of favorite Christmas tree varieties, but almost all the Fraser firs sold in Georgia come from North Carolina. One University of Georgia horticulturist is working to change that by popularizing a hybrid that combines Fraser firs with their Japanese cousins — Momi firs.
Participants view exhibits at the 2010 Southeast Bioenergy Conference at the University of Georgia Tifton Campus Conference Center. CAES News
Alternative energy conference
From wood pellet and biodiesel production or mining landfills for methane to running county patrol cars and busses on everything from propane to peanut oil — Georgia has become a laboratory for testing new energy technologies.
The 2013 Ag to Port Ag Forecast will focus on Georgia's agricultural exports. CAES News
Farm to port
As emerging international markets for Georgia agricultural products continue to grow, Georgia farmers need to be aware of the impacts the global marketplace can have on their bottom line. This year, in recognition of the growing importance of the global marketplace to Georgia farmers, Georgia Department of Economic Development Director of International Trade Kathe Falls will deliver the keynote talks at the 2013 Ag Forecast series. The Farm-to-Port Ag Forecast will be held in locations across the state Jan. 25 to Feb. 1.
A red maple tree blooms on the campus of the University of Georgia Mountain Research and Education Center in Blairsville, Ga. CAES News
Adding shade
The glaring summer heat may have you convinced to add more shade to your landscape. Fall is the perfect time to plant trees to create that needed shade.
A twig girdler chews on a branch. CAES News
Twig munchers
If something appears to be chewing off the ends of tree branches in your landscape, that something is most likely a twig girdler.
Sorghum plant growing in the field. CAES News
Biofuels research grants
In the ongoing search for cleaner, renewable energy sources, biofuels derived from trees, shrubs and grasses have emerged as a strong candidate. But creating the next generation’s energy source is not as simple as growing a few crops; extensive research is required to ensure these plants produce enough biomass and fuel per acre to make biomass farming economically viable.
A row of pines at the Westbrook Research Farm on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day
Land is a valuable resource and provides immense benefits to humans and to wildlife. Landowners, farmers or sportsmen who wish to increase the value and benefits of the land they own, hunt or manage should make plans to attend the 2012 Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day on Thursday, Sept. 20, 2012 at the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga.
Engraver beetles leave pin-sized holds in the bark of pine trees when they exit the tree. CAES News
Pine bark beetles
Pine bark beetles can be the death of pines in forests and home landscapes.