Browse Forestry Stories - Page 2

42 results found for Forestry
Thinning pine stands benefits the timber stand and the owner. Reducing stand density reduces competition for nutrients, space and light and improves the vigor, growth rate and overall quality of the remaining trees. CAES News
Agroforestry & Wildlife
Pine straw production, timber sales and wildlife management will top the list of topics at the Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day slated for Thursday, Sept. 20, at the University of Georgia’s Westbrook Research Farm in Griffin, Georgia.
Thinning pine stands benefits the timber stand and the owner. Reducing stand density reduces competition for nutrients, space and light and improves the vigor, growth rate and overall quality of the remaining trees. CAES News
Thinning Pines
Proper management of a pine stand requires thinning in order to prevent disease and insect infestation and to maximize profit. Thinning is the process of cutting or removing certain trees from a stand to regulate the number, quality and distribution of the remaining trees.
Southern Regional Extension Forestry (SREF), in collaboration with eXtension, an online learning resource for Cooperative Extension System professionals, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, have launched the Climate Learning Network (CLN) website — a clearinghouse for the most up-to-date climate information for farmers, homeowners, natural resources professionals and Extension personnel. CAES News
Climate Learning Network
Southern Regional Extension Forestry (SREF), in collaboration with eXtension, an online learning resource for Cooperative Extension System professionals, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, have launched the Climate Learning Network (CLN) website, climatelearning.net, as a clearinghouse for the most up-to-date information for farmers, homeowners, natural resources professionals and Extension personnel.
Recycle your Christmas tree this year into something useful like a bottle tree or mulch for your garden. Bartow County residents are shown transforming Christmas trees into fish habitats. CAES News
Recycled Christmas Trees
You took time to select and decorate the perfect live Christmas tree for the holiday. Now put a little forethought and time into recycling it. University of Georgia Extension offers suggestions on how to creatively recycle this year’s Christmas tree.
Christmas plants, like these Christmas cacti and Norfolk Island pine, can make the perfect gift for the green thumbs on your holiday list. CAES News
Living Christmas Trees
Container-grown or balled-and-burlapped Christmas trees can be planted as landscape trees after the holidays. This way of enjoying a Christmas tree is practical in Georgia, where the mild December or early January weather is ideal for tree planting. With care and planning, your Christmas tree will serve as a living memory for many years.
Freshly cut Christmas trees lined up for purchase at the Lowe's Home Improvement store in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
Christmas Trees
Before buying a pre-cut Christmas tree, put it through a few freshness tests, says University of Georgia Extension Agent Adam Speir. Christmas trees can be kept healthy and green through the holidays by following these tips.
Two steers graze on sorghum/sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages. CAES News
Farmgate Value Report
Led by increases in forestry and livestock values, Georgia’s agricultural output increased by $484 million in 2014, making agriculture, once again, the largest industry in the state with a value of $14.1 billion. According to the most recent University of Georgia Farmgate Value Report, published earlier this month, the value of Georgia’s livestock and aquaculture industries increased by almost 36 percent from 2013.
Conks, fibrous but sometimes fleshy fruiting bodies of a wood-rotting fungus, grow on a tree CAES News
Tree Decay
Wood-rotting organisms can slowly nibble away at tree trunks and buttress roots. Many trees that topple look perfectly healthy before they fall. Afterward, it becomes clear that there were absolutely no structural roots remaining for support.
Fall is the perfect time to install new trees or shrubs or to move existing ones to new locations. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts recommend digging the planting hole two to three times the diameter of the soil ball. CAES News
Tree Planting
The transition of leaf color symbolizes an end to the growing season, but it is the best time of year to start trees in our landscape. When correctly sited and planted, a fall-planted tree will perform better than a spring-planted tree because the fall tree will establish roots before the warm summer temperatures draw moisture from and cause stress to the tree.
CAES News
Forestry Field Day
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the UGA Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources are teaming up to host a Southeast Georgia Forestry Field Day and Workshop. Georgia landowners, timber managers and forestry industry personnel are encouraged to attend the free event.