Browse Plant Breeding Stories - Page 3

27 results found for Plant Breeding
The ‘Avalon’ pecan, compared here to two other varieties, is a highly desired cultivar due to its extreme resistance to scab disease. CAES News
Avalon Variety
The University of Georgia’s newest pecan variety will be released next spring and has shown good resistance against scab disease so far, according to Patrick Conner, a horticultural scientist at the UGA Tifton Campus.
A picture of a corn field from a few years ago. Recent rains have helped this year's corn crop, according to UGA Extension specialist Eric Prostko. CAES News
Road Trip
Like many other young people, plant pathology graduate student Russell Ingram’s friends have an epic road trip planned for this summer. The difference is that instead of setting off for a music festival in the desert or visiting a beach, Ingram’s pals are hitting the road in search of jobs.
Two women tour the organic production plots at UGA's Durham Horticulture Farm during UGA's 2014 Organic Twilight Tour. CAES News
Twilight Tour
Organic and sustainable agriculture experts from the University of Georgia will host their fifth annual Organic Twilight Tour on Thursday, July 14 from 6-8 p.m. at the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Durham Horticulture Farm at 1221 Hog Mountain Road in Watkinsville, Georgia.
UGArden manager JoHannah Biang teaches Andy Myers, Lipscomb University student of sustainability and environmental agriculture, how to drive a small tractor as part of a workshop at the 2015 Georgia Organics Conference, Feb. 20-21, in Athens. CAES News
Organic Farming Classes
University of Georgia organic agriculture experts and economists are teaming up to present the Organic Farming Workshop to provide farmers with new ways to maximize the ecology and economical sustainability of their farm.
Fanbin Kong, a researcher in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Food Science Technology, has spent is career studying how our bodies interact with the food we eat. CAES News
Nanocellulose Study
University of Georgia food engineer Fanbin Kong has been awarded a more than $496,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture to study the safety of nanocellulose and how it affects humans’ food digestion and nutrient absorption.
A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird. CAES News
Pollinator Plan
Many food items, including fresh fruits and vegetables, would never make it to grocery store or farmers market shelves without the help of beneficial insects like honeybees and butterflies. The number of these pollinating insects in the U.S. is declining, and to help, Georgia agricultural experts developed a statewide plan to teach gardeners and landscapers how to care for their plants and protect these vulnerable insects that are vital to food production.
Sangaya Rajaram and Norman Borlaug working in wheat fields in Mexico. CAES News
D.W. Brooks Lecture
In a time of public debate over the effectiveness and safety of genetically modified foods, it’s hard to picture the era before crop breeders developed grain varieties that could withstand drought and common diseases.