Browse Human Development and Family Science Stories - Page 5

74 results found for Human Development and Family Science
Lines of school buses idling outside schools creates harmful air pollution and wastes fuel. To protect students' lung, and save engine parts, bus, and parents' vehicles, should not idle while waiting for students to exit school buildings, University of Georgia experts say. CAES News
Return to Structure
Summer break is almost over. That’s right — no more late nights, naps during the day and, my favorite, living without a schedule. While I hate to remind you that our time will no longer be our own, I hope to make it easier for parents, as well as teachers, to return to their respective routines, which includes getting children back to school. As parents, we are instrumental in our children’s educational success. There are some things we can do to prepare little ones for success in the classroom.
More than 160,000 children nationwide miss school every day out of fear of being bullied, according to the National Education Association. CAES News
Stop Bullying
Today, bullies have more ways to inflict mental and physical abuse than they did just 10 years ago, said Cheryl Varnadoe, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension 4-H Youth Development specialist. Fortunately, children being bullied also have more outlets in which to seek help and refuge from the abuse.
Pamela Turner, UGA Extension housing specialist, serves on the boards of the Georgia Healthy Home Coalition and the Rural Georgia Healthy Housing Advisory Board, both of which worked with Gov. Nathan Deal to proclaim June Healthy Homes Month. CAES News
Healthy Homes Month
Georgia homeowners have the information that they need to make sure their houses are safe and healthy thanks to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Rural Georgia Healthy Homes Advisory Board. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development designated June as National Healthy Homes Month to encourage homeowners to inspect their homes for hidden hazards, like mold, radon and lead.
The Georgia Traffic Injury Prevention Institute (GTIPI) will offer four training and community education initiatives through this year's grant award. CAES News
Driver Education/Safety
The University of Georgia Traffic Injury Prevention Institute has been awarded a $656,000 grant from the Georgia Governor’s Office of Highway Safety (GOHS) to continue statewide child passenger safety, parent and teen driving safety, and senior driver education programs.
UGA Cooperative Extension's Walk Georgia program has hosted more than 100 fitness events around the state over the past three years. CAES News
Walk Georgia
For almost a decade, Georgians have been getting active with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s Walk Georgia. The statewide health and wellness program has impacted more than 100,000 people, and it has spurred whole schools, workplaces and communities to get out and explore their state.
CAES News
Air Quality
The air quality in north Georgia has suffered over the past weeks due to several wildfires burning across the north Georgia mountains. While the smoke ebbs and flows depending on the direction of the wind, smoke is likely to be an issue for at least the next few weeks.
Tips for roasting, smoking or frying your turkey, provided by UGA Extension food safety expert Judy Harrison. CAES News
Turkey Cooking
It’s holiday turkey-eating time. Follow these tips from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension to make sure you cook a tasty turkey while combating bacteria and other foodborne pathogens.
As a result of a roof leak, mold grows on the ceiling of a home. CAES News
Mold control
Homes along the coast of Georgia were drastically damaged by Hurricane Matthew. Homes that weren't structurally damaged may soon show signs of a sneaky and dangerous aftereffect: mold.
Family members of all ages can join in the fun and play "Pokemon Go." The game was designed to encourage activity, but University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say be mindful of your surroundings and don't focus just on the game. CAES News
"Pokemon Go"
A new technological craze has invaded our towns and cities. “Pokemon Go” has people wandering around aimlessly, looking at their phones. Because “catching” those little characters can be distracting, players sometimes put themselves into dangerous situations as a result of being unaware of their surroundings. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension urges “Pokemon Go” players to be alert at all times.
5-year-old Parks Powell plays an educational game on his parents' iPad. CAES News
Kids and Tablets
Tablets have become commonplace in today’s classrooms, even as early as preschool or kindergarten. If used appropriately, these touchscreen devices can enhance instruction, according to a UGA Cooperative Extension specialist.