Browse Food Preservation Stories

40 results found for Food Preservation
FoodPIC director Jim Gratzek CAES News
New FoodPIC director
Food technology entrepreneur James Gratzek will serve as the next director of the Food Product Innovation and Commercialization Center on the University of Georgia Griffin campus, according to the Department of Food Science and Technology at the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Foodborne botulism can be prevented with proper canning techniques and equipment that prevent contamination, according to UGA Extension food safety specialist Carla Schwan. CAES News
Canning Precautions
As home canning season approaches, a University of Georgia food safety expert stressed the need for proper precautions to avoid foodborne illness. A recent death in Washington state was attributed to botulism, a toxin that is a byproduct of the heat-resistant spores of a bacterium called Clostridium botulinum that likely originated from a home-canned food.
Angelos Deltsidis is an assistant professor with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences' horticulture department. (Photo by Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA) CAES News
Reducing Food Waste
When Angelos Deltsidis isn’t in the lab or in the field, he can usually be found on the road or trail, putting in miles on a long run through nature. But his runs aren’t simply spent enjoying the greenery—he is also focusing on what the plants produce, how they do it and gathering research ideas. He is finding inspiration.
Carla Schwan has been hired as an assistant professor and Extension specialist in food safety and home food preservation in the University Georgia’s College of Family and Consumer Sciences, beginning January 2022. CAES News
Food Preservation Lead
Carla Schwan has been hired as an assistant professor and University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialist in food safety and home food preservation in UGA’s College of Family and Consumer Sciences. She is slated to get started January 2022.
Tracey Brigman, clinical assistant professor in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, has been named interim FACS coordinator of food safety and preservation. CAES News
Teaming up to promote food preservation safety
A team of University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents, led by a faculty member in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, will address consumer questions on food safety and preservation while overseeing the National Center for Home Food Preservation on an interim basis.
Salsas are an example of an acidified food and appropriate for boiling water canning if the final pH of all components is less than 4.6. (photo by Kayla Wall) CAES News
Tomato Preservation
It’s the height of tomato season in Georgia and the harvest is abundant. Tomatoes can be preserved by canning, drying, freezing or pickling. They can also be used in creating fruit spreads like jams, jellies and marmalades.
Preserving peaches by canning, freezing or drying is the best way to extend the use of this popular fruit long after the harvest is over. CAES News
Tips for preserving peaches
The first Georgia peach crop of the year is arriving at roadside fruit stands, farm markets and grocery stores. Preserving peaches by canning, freezing or drying is the best way to extend the use of this popular fruit long after the harvest is over.
Label your food prior to freezing and include the date it was packaged. CAES News
Freezing fruits and vegetables
Freezing is one of the easiest and most convenient ways to extend the shelf life of fresh fruits and vegetables.
‘Orange Bulldog’ is an improved pumpkin variety developed by UGA scientists from germplasm collected in the jungles of South America. It has greater levels of resistance to viruses than conventional pumpkins. ‘Orange Bulldog’ made its debut in 2004 and has consistently produced yields of 13,000 to 20,000 pounds per acre in north and south Georgia. CAES News
Pumpkin Pointers
Georgia farmers devote about 900 acres to growing pumpkins — technically a squash and a cousin to the cucumber. Most Georgia-grown pumpkins come from the northernmost part of the state where the climate is cooler and there is less disease pressure. UGA-bred ‘Orange Bulldog' is disease resistant.
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of tomatoes also controls the shape of potatoes and may control the shape of other fruits as well. CAES News
Produce Safety Grants
Three University of Georgia food scientists are among the recipients of grants awarded by the Center for Produce Safety (CPS) as part of its $2.7 million program. The grants will fund projects focused on food safety issues related to fruits and vegetables.