Browse Irrigation Stories - Page 3

53 results found for Irrigation
Chemigation treatments on cotton in a UGA research trial. CAES News
Chemigation
Pesticide application through center pivot irrigation systems, called “chemigation,” could allow Georgia cotton growers to treat multiple fields while lowering application costs and minimizing exposure to chemicals. University of Georgia entomologist Michael Toews is studying the efficacy of this method.
Endue Brown, a Sumter County 4-H'er, collects water from an irrigation pivot during a previous 4-H20 camp. CAES News
4-H20 Camp
A blend of fun and education, the Mitchell County 4-H20 day camp is designed to introduce students to the importance of water conservation and irrigation. The three-day camp is held every year, and will include a visit to the University of Georgia C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park in Camilla, Georgia, on June 22.
An overhead view of variable rate irrigation and soil moisture sensor research at Adam McLendon's farm. CAES News
Variable Rate Irrigation
The combination of soil moisture sensors and variable rate irrigation (VRI) may help some Georgia farmers increase their yields while decreasing their water usage, according to an ongoing study by University of Georgia precision agriculture specialist George Vellidis and irrigation specialist Wes Porter.
This is a file photo of a center pivot irrigation system being used. CAES News
Spring Irrigation
Leaky pipes, flat tires and rodent-infested electrical boxes are issues that should be addressed now by farmers with irrigation systems, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension precision agriculture and irrigation specialist Wes Porter.
This is a file photo of a center pivot irrigation system being used. CAES News
Irrigation Scheduling
To better conserve water, as well as abide by federal regulations regarding the use of irrigation, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension expert encourages Georgia farmers to develop an irrigation scheduling strategy.
There were almost 800,000 acres of peanuts grown in Georgia in 2015. CAES News
Irrigation In Peanuts
Georgia peanut farmers can’t control rainfall or the recent deluge the state received over the last week. They can, however, control how much water they apply to their crops through irrigation. A University of Georgia researcher believes applying too much water to peanuts can invite diseases and reduce yields.
Two steers graze on sorghum/sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages. CAES News
Farmgate Value Report
Led by increases in forestry and livestock values, Georgia’s agricultural output increased by $484 million in 2014, making agriculture, once again, the largest industry in the state with a value of $14.1 billion. According to the most recent University of Georgia Farmgate Value Report, published earlier this month, the value of Georgia’s livestock and aquaculture industries increased by almost 36 percent from 2013.
Sub-surface drip irrigation gets implemented in a field at Stripling Irrigation Research Park in Camilla, Georgia. CAES News
Sub-Surface Drip Irrigation
Drip irrigation systems have long helped Georgia vegetable farmers grow high yielding crops. Sub-surface drip irrigation can help some Georgia peanut farmers water their crops more efficiently, according to a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension expert. And, it won’t interfere with peanut digging equipment.
Here's a closeup picture of blueberries being grown in Alapaha. Picture taken in May, 2013. CAES News
Blueberry Freeze
Early blueberry varieties felt the chill of deep freezes during January and February, according to University of Georgia blueberry specialist Erick Smith.
Sheri Dorn, Extension horticulturist and state master gardener coordinator on the UGA Griffin Campus, works at the Sunbelt Expo in Moultrie on Wednesday, Oct. 15. CAES News
Sunbelt Expo
Rain or shine, the Sunbelt Agricultural Expo in Moultrie is the place to be for farmers and others working in the field of agriculture. The 37th annual Expo was no different as thousands flocked to south Georgia this week to see new technologies, learn from university scientists and see the latest farming equipment on the market.