Browse Lawn and Garden Stories

950 results found for Lawn and Garden
UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers Sharon Kane and Becky Griffin put together a map displaying the economic value of pollinators to spread awareness about the impact of pollinators and the necessity of continued conservation. (Photo by Chamberlain Smith/UGA) CAES News
Economics of Pollination
From beetles to butterflies, pollinators are a beautiful and integral part of nature. However, these tiny creatures may be more economically important to agricultural and ecological systems than previously thought. In a recent project by the Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development at the University of Georgia, economist Sharon Kane and plant protection expert Becky Griffin have put together a powerful map displaying the economic importance of pollinators across Georgia.  
CFMG Habitat CAES News
CFMG Habitat For Humanity
On a stormy day in September 2009, a crew of Central Fulton Master Gardeners were nearly knee-deep in mud, installing landscaping on their first house for a partnership with Atlanta Habitat for Humanity. It was not how anyone envisioned the project kick-off. More than 14 years later, CFMG has maintained its commitment to the organization, completing its 500th Habitat project — a fitting milestone as the national Extension Master Gardener program celebrates its golden jubilee this year.
UGArden serves as a drop-off point for Athens-Clarke County composting. Anyone can drop off compostable materials at the farm at no charge. For information visit ugarden.uga.edu/home/compost-information. CAES News
Composting Tips
Composting has become a popular topic in recent years, and many of us have heard that it is something we should be doing in some form. But why? There are many reasons that individuals, communities and governments promote composting, with some focused on diverting compostable waste from landfills and others who are in it for the dirt.
The caterpillar relies on its appearance to deter attackers and, when disturbed, it aggressively twists and writhes on the ground to defend itself. In its final, less terrifying form, the regal moth displays autumnal-colored wings in shades of deep orange with gray stripes and yellow spots. (Art by Jay B. Bauer) CAES News
Hickory Horned Devil
With a name that conjures the spookiest Halloween imagery, the hickory horned devil (Citheronia regalis) caterpillar is a marvel of nature's creativity, boasting a fearsome-looking appearance that is both off-putting and intriguing. This time of year, unsuspecting passersby may have the rare chance to spot this spectacular caterpillar as it drops from trees.
University of Georgia Athletic Association Endowed Professor Gerald Henry leads a research team in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences committed to creating sports fields that can limit the occurrence of injuries for the athletes playing on them. (Photo by Jason Thrasher) CAES News
Gerald Henry
When the two-time reigning national champion Georgia Bulldogs step between the hedges at Sanford Stadium this fall, Dooley Field needs to look the part. More importantly, though, it needs to help safeguard the health of athletes who compete on it. Gerald Henry plays a big role in the latter.
UGA Extension coordinator and census creator Becky Griffin holds a commendation from Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp honoring the Great Southeast Pollinator Census citizen-science initiative, which is in its fifth year. CAES News
Census Commendation
The Great Southeast Pollinator Census, which will be held Aug. 18 and 19 this year, received a commendation from Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp in advance of the annual event’s fifth anniversary. The governor honored the contributions of the citizen-science project to the continued health of pollinators in the region.
Considered a native of the Eastern U.S., the smooth hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens) is a showy shrub that sports large, velvety leaves and chartreuse-to-white blooms. (Photo by Sheri Dorn) CAES News
Smokin Hot Garden
Has the heat got you inside looking out? Are you enjoying gardens and landscapes only from the comfort of your air-conditioned car? Indeed we are in the throes of summer in Georgia, but even though it’s brutal for us outside, there are many landscape plants that are in their glory this time of year.
Irrigation systems can help get water to plants when it is needed, but always follow best practices. Avoid wetting plant foliage for prolonged periods of time to reduce risk of plant disease. Make sure irrigation water lands in the beds so that no water is wasted on sidewalks and driveways. (Photo by Sheri Dorn) CAES News
Summer Irrigation
As summer heats up, Georgians tend to worry about how hot it’s going to be and how dry. To properly care for the plants in our landscapes and gardens this Smart Irrigation Month, residents need to pay a little extra attention to temperatures and rainfall in order to supplement water when needed.
Plants with contrasting or showy characteristics, like this weeping, red, cut-leaf Japanese maple, can provide a clever solution to filling a hole in the landscape. CAES News
Landscape Refresh
Now that the weather has warmed up, many Georgians have found that where their yards once had healthy and full plantings, there are now holes and scraps of plants. Residents of Georgia and other parts of the Southeast inevitably arrive at the same observation: Cold temperatures this past December and weather conditions in subsequent months wreaked havoc on home landscapes.
IMG 2016 CAES News
Micro Roses
Roses are red … and dozens of cultivated hues. Whatever their colors, they are among the most popular flower throughout the year for many consumers, from long-stemmed Valentine’s bouquets and Mother’s Day arrangements to a bounty of varieties available for planting in landscapes during the summer and fall.