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Welcome to the Georgia Master Gardener Extension Volunteer Program!

The Master Gardener program in Georgia is a volunteer training program designed to help University of Georgia Cooperative Extension staff transfer research-based information about gardening and related subjects to the public by training home gardeners. Master Gardener Extension Volunteers are active in many Georgia counties. Through this program, Cooperative Extension is able to reach out and serve more citizens with educational programming and demonstrations in these 5 target areas:

Environmental Stewardship – Increasing awareness and knowledge of landscape and garden management for the optimum use and protection of the environment, including management of all aspects of the residential landscape (soil, plants, insects, diseases, and wildlife); and understanding and proper use of equipment, pesticides, fertilizers, and other landscaping inputs to have the greatest value with little negative impact on the environment.

Home Food Production – Teaching the benefits of home food production and developing skills and knowledge in growing food, managing community gardens, or contributing to food banks or kitchens.

Gardening with Youth – Increasing young people’s awareness and understanding of the value of horticulture and landscaping, using horticulture as a tool to increase responsibility and leadership for youth, and teaching individuals and professionals (i.e., teachers and therapists) how to use horticulture to reach young people.

Value of Landscapes – Developing within communities the knowledge and skill to ensure proper design, installation, and maintenance of sustainable landscapes for economic benefit to residents, state and local government employees and agencies, and professionals in impacted fields, such as tourism and real-estate development.

Health Benefits of Gardening – Teaching the value of the interior and exterior landscape to human health, well-being, and quality of life, transferring knowledge and skills to intended audiences that they might utilize this information for personal health and a healthier workplace and community.

Volunteers benefit from the training, networking with other garden enthusiasts and the opportunity to serve their communities. For more information about the Master Gardener program in your area, contact the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office nearest you.

Looking for an answer to a gardening question? Use your ZIP code to search for the UGA Cooperative Extension office nearest you or call 1-800-ASK-UGA1 to connect.

 

News from Georgia FACES!

  • Fall trainings focus on chainsaw safety
    July 30, 2015 - University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is presenting chainsaw trainings designed to educate Georgia’s landscape and tree care workers on the safe use of chainsaws.
  • Rabbits can be rascally foes in the garden
    July 29, 2015 - While rabbits may seem cute and fuzzy, the common rabbit or eastern cottontail can do considerable damage to flowers, vegetables, trees and shrubs any time of the year in places ranging from suburban yards to rural fields and tree plantations.
  • Healthy Soil, Healthy Community Initiative to provide compost workshops in metro Atlanta
    July 29, 2015 - Food Well Alliance, in collaboration with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and other organizations, designed the Healthy Soil, Healthy Community Initiative to help Atlanta’s community gardens adopt better composting practices to improve metro Atlanta’s soil.
  • Georgia cotton farmers should consider rye as a cover crop
    July 27, 2015 - Georgia cotton farmers can benefit from using rye as a cover crop, according to scientists on the University of Georgia Tifton Campus. Along with providing an added defense against glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth at planting, rye significantly reduces thrips infestations and could save farmers irrigation expenses.
  • Calcium-related disorder impacts Georgia's bell pepper production
    July 20, 2015 - Georgia’s bell pepper farmers experienced a setback in production this spring. According to University of Georgia vegetable horticulturist Tim Coolong, some Georgia growers experienced losses of up to 25 percent due to blossom end rot — a calcium-related disorder.
  • National Center for Home Food Preservation launches youth canning curriculum: "Put it Up!"
    July 16, 2015 - With more and more students growing their own produce through community and school gardens, it only makes sense that many students are ready to take the next step and “put up” some of those hard-earned veggies and fruits.

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University of Georgia (UGA) College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES)