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Welcome to the Georgia Master Gardener Extension Volunteer Program!

The Master Gardener program in Georgia is a volunteer training program designed to help University of Georgia Cooperative Extension staff transfer research-based information about gardening and related subjects to the public by training home gardeners. Master Gardener Extension Volunteers are active in many Georgia counties. Through this program, Cooperative Extension is able to reach out and serve more citizens with educational programming and demonstrations in 5 target areas.

State Initiatives

Environmental Stewardship – Increasing awareness and knowledge of landscape and garden management for the optimum use and protection of the environment, including management of all aspects of the residential landscape (soil, plants, insects, diseases, and wildlife), understanding and proper use of equipment, pesticides, fertilizers, and other landscaping inputs to have the greatest value with little negative impact on the environment.

Home Food Production – Teaching the benefits of home food production and developing skills and knowledge in growing food, managing community gardens, or contributing to food banks or kitchens.

Gardening with Youth – Increasing young people’s awareness and understanding of the value of horticulture and landscaping, using horticulture as a tool to increase responsibility and leadership for youth, and teaching individuals and professionals (i.e., teachers and therapists) how to use horticulture to reach young people.

Value of Landscapes – Developing within communities the knowledge and skill to ensure proper design, installation, and maintenance of sustainable landscapes for economic benefit to residents, state and local government employees and agencies, and professionals in impacted fields, such as tourism and real-estate development.

Health Benefits of Gardening – Teaching the value of the interior and exterior landscape for human health, well-being, and quality of life, transferring knowledge and skills to intended audiences so that they might utilize this information for personal health and a healthier workplace and community.

Volunteers benefit from the training, networking with other garden enthusiasts, and the opportunity to serve their communities. For more information about the Master Gardener program in your area, contact the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office nearest you.

Looking for an answer to a gardening question? Use your ZIP code to search for the UGA Cooperative Extension office nearest you or call 1-800-ASK-UGA1 to connect.


News from Georgia FACES!

  • The truth about organic gardening
    October 21, 2016 - Organic gardening has become quite popular among gardeners, but a considerable confusion exists about what organic gardening is and what it is not.
  • Hurricanes make you appreciate floral beauty like the old-fashioned zinnia
    October 19, 2016 - After a hurricane, you find beauty and pleasure in simple things. In my case, it is the old-fashioned zinnia. Now I say “old-fashioned” because we grew them from generic seed packets, so I don’t know the variety. I would say it is the zinnia you grew up with as a kid.
  • New UGA scientist searches for grasses that can survive drought, heat and other environmental stressors
    October 18, 2016 - New Jersey native David Jespersen was selected to fill retired UGA turfgrass physiologist Bob Carrow’s position based in part on his research on the effects of heat stress on creeping bentgrass. Jespersen is adjusting to life in the South and to working on a small extended university campus.
  • Foundation plants must tolerate hot conditions and hard soil
    October 17, 2016 - What makes a good foundation plant for your home landscape? Any plant that can tolerate extreme heat, highly compact soil and a highly alkaline soil pH is a good candidate.
  • Repair the landscape damaged by Hurricane Matthew one step at a time
    October 13, 2016 - When rebuilding your landscape after storm damage, do it in small, concentrated outdoor rooms or pockets, one area at a time. This method will help homeowners from getting overwhelmed. What took a few hours to bring down may take weeks to clean up.
  • Saturated soil no good for gardening or driving
    October 13, 2016 - Rainfall from Hurricane Matthew has left soil in coastal south Georgia completely saturated. Rainy conditions like these wreak havoc on gardeners and farmers who need to do yard or field work. In many cases, the best way to deal with the situation is to wait for drier conditions.


University of Georgia (UGA) College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES)